Farzad Khoshdast has been making narrative and non-fiction films since 1993 when he wrote and directed How Hard is to Fly, produced by the Iranian Youth Cinema Association. Making movies on 8mm, 16mm and 35mm, he made his first feature with documentary The Chronicle of an Unfinished Filmmaker in 2010 and moved into television with 2011’s series The Light of District. In 2017, he directed a short film dedicated to the memory of Abbas Kiarostami, as well as A Woman Without a Name about women in prison. He researched, wrote, directed and edited. The film was nominated for the F:ACT Award at 2018 CPH:DOX festival. In 2019 he again researched, wrote, produced and directed The Narrow Red Line about male juvenile offenders putting on a theatrical show for which he received his first APSA nomination for Best Documentary Feature Film.

Accolades

Farzad Khoshdast and Negar Eskandarfar
Best Documentary Film, 2019

Narrow Red Line (Khat-e Barik-e Ghermez)

Best Documentary Film, 2019

Narrow Red Line (Khat-e Barik-e Ghermez)

In a bleak Iranian Juvenile Rehabilitation and Correction Centre, a group of teenage delinquents and juvenile defenders decide to put on a stage show that…

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Films

Narrow Red Line
2019

Narrow Red Line (Khat-e Barik-e Ghermez)

Islamic Republic of Iran
2019

Narrow Red Line (Khat-e Barik-e Ghermez)

In a bleak Iranian Juvenile Rehabilitation and Correction Centre, a group of teenage delinquents and juvenile defenders decide to put on a stage show that…

More Details

The Asia Pacific Screen Academy expresses its respect for and acknowledgement of the South East Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. We pay our respects to the Traditional Owners of country, including the custodial communities on whose land works are created and celebrated by the Asia Pacific Screen Awards. We acknowledge the continuing connection to land, waters and communities. We also pay our respects to Elders, past and emerging. We recognise the integral role Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and First Nations peoples continue to play in storytelling and celebration spaces.

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