Sergei Puskepalis was born in 1966 in Kursk, Russia. After graduating from Saratov Theater Institute he performed in the Saratov Youth Theatre. Since 2001 Sergei has staged numerous productions all across Russia. From 2003 to 2007 Sergei helmed Magnitogorsk Drama Theater, and in 2009 was appointed the Artistic Director of Yaroslavl Drama Theater, Russia’s oldest professional stage company. Sergei met director Alexei Popogrebsky on the set of Roads to Koktebel (2003), which starred his son Gleb Puskapalis. Alexei’s film, Simple Things (2007), became Sergei’s debut in film. The lead part of underpaid anesthetist Maslov won Sergei numerous accolades, including Best Actor at Sochi and Karlovy Vary International Film Festivals. Sergei does not actively pursue a career in film, but the part in How I Ended This Summer (2010) always had his name on it.

Accolades

Sergei Puskepalis
Best Actor, 2010

Sergei Puskepalis

Best Actor, 2010

Sergei Puskepalis

How I Ended This Summer (Kak ya provel etim letom)

Sergei Puskepalis was born in 1966in Kursk, Russia. After graduating from Saratov Theater Institute he performed in the Saratov Youth Theatre. Since 2001 Sergei has…

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Films

How I Ended This Summer
2010

How I Ended This Summer (Kak ya provel etim letom)

Russian Federation
2010

How I Ended This Summer (Kak ya provel etim letom)

A polar station on a desolate island in the Arctic Ocean. Sergei, a seasoned meteorologist, and Pavel, a recent college graduate, are spending months in…

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