Yemen

Khadija Al-Salami

Chair

Khadija is Yemen’s first woman filmmaker, and has made some over 25 documentaries for various TV stations in France and Yemen and received several awards at various film festivals worldwide. With Charles Hoots, she has written a book, “The Tears of Sheba,” about her experiences growing up in Yemen.  She also wrote the book Nada “la rose de matin”. She occupied until 2012 the post of Press Counselor and Director of the Communication and Cultural Center at the Embassy of Yemen in Paris.

Among the awards she received: The Knight of the Order of Arts & Letters awarded by the French Culture Minister Frederic Mitterrand.  Inspiring woman, chosen by the Mosaic Foundation (Washington D.C. Medal of Honor rank of Knight (Chevalier) awarded by the French President Jacques Chirac.

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Anthony Krause is Chief of the Policy and Research Unit in the Section for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (Culture sector) at UNESCO. He joined UNESCO in 2003 as Executive Officer in the Office of the Director-General (2003-2009), then Chief of the Culture Unit in the Regional Bureau for Science and Culture in Europe (Venice, Italy), responsible for the implementation of culture programmes in South-East Europe (2009-2013). Previously, he was Assistant Professor in contemporary history at the National Institute for Oriental Languages and Civilizations (INALCO, Paris). A former fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies (Budapest Collegium, Hungary), he is a graduate from the Ecole Normale Supérieure and holder of an Agrégation in History. He earned a Ph.D. in contemporary history from INALCO, Paris, in 2000 and is the author of numerous articles on Hungary and central European history. For the 2018 APSA Cultural Diversity International Jury, Anthony Krause represents UNESCO and is unaffiliated with any one nation.

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Lao People's Democratic Republic

Mattie Do

Born in Los Angeles to recent immigrant parents who left during the communist revolution in Laos, Mattie Do returned to Vientiane in 2010 with her husband and whippet to take care of her retired father. Noting that Lao-language films were scarce and that few featured strong female protagonists or stories, she became determined to make a feature film. At the time, Laos had no functioning filmmaking infrastructure and only one cinema in the capital city. Mattie uses horror and supernatural storytelling to convey messages about women’s roles and delicate social issues. In 2012, Mattie debuted her film, Chanthaly, at the Luang Prabang International Film Festival. The film has since become the first Lao film to screen at major festivals in America and Europe. Do’s second feature film Dearest Sister was chosen to attend the 2014 Cannes Film Festival as part of the La Fabrique des Cinémas du monde program and was selected as the Laotian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 90th Academy Awards, the first time that Laos has submitted a film for consideration in this category. Do is the first Lao woman to direct a feature film. She has also produced Jamie M Dagg’s River (2015) and Bangkok Nites (2016) for director Katsuya Tomita, which competed for the Golden Leopard at Locarno International Film Festival.

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