Born 1974, Texas, USA. Joshua Oppenheimer has worked for over a decade with militias, death squads and their victims to explore the relationship between political violence and the public imagination. Educated at Harvard and Central St Martins, London, his award-winning films include The Globalization Tapes (2003, co-directed with Christine Cynn), The Entire History of The Louisiana Purchase (1998, Gold Hugo, Chicago Film Festival), These Places We’ve Learned to Call Home (1996, Gold Spire, San Francisco Film Festival) and numerous shorts. Oppenheimer is Senior Researcher on the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Genocide and Genre project and has published widely on these themes.

His debut feature film The Act of Killing was nominated for the 2013 Academy Award® for Best Documentary, and has been released theatrically in 31 countries. The film was also named Film of the Year in the 2013 Sight & Sound Film Poll and won 72 international awards, including the European Film Award 2013, BAFTA 2014, Asia Pacific Screen Award 2013, Berlinale Audience Award 2013, and Guardian Film Award 2014 for Best Film.
Oppenheimer is a partner at Final Cut for Real in Denmark and Artistic Director of the International Centre for Documentary and Experimental Film at the University of Westminster in London.

Films

The Act of Killing
2013

The Act of Killing

Norway, United Kingdom, Denmark
2013

The Act of Killing

Anwar Congo and his friends have been dancing their way through musical numbers, twisting arms in film noir gangster scenes, and galloping across prairies as…

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The Look of Silence
2014

The Look of Silence (Senyap)

Indonesia, Finland, Denmark, United Kingdom, Norway
2014

The Look of Silence (Senyap)

The Look of Silence is Joshua Oppenheimer’s and the anonymous Indonesian directors and producers powerful companion piece to The Act of Killing. Via their footage…

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